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ASU researchers receive $3.9 million in NIH grants

Flinn staff reports

Summary:

Ranu Jung and James Abbas, researchers at Arizona State University, have been awarded $3.9 million in NIH grants to advance efforts to repair or replace lost function in people with spinal cord injuries or other neurological disorders. Their work with recording spinal cord activity could someday guide development of "smart prosthetics."

Full Story:

Ranu Jung and James Abbas, researchers at Arizona State University, have been awarded $3.9 million in grants to advance efforts to repair or replace lost function in people with spinal cord injuries or other neurological disorders.

In April, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Jung a $404,000 grant to design, fabricate, and test a neural clamp that records spinal cord activity. The data could someday guide development of "smart prosthetics," microprocessor-controlled components that provide sensory feedback to a prosthetic and allow it to make dynamic and delicate adjustments. A smart prosthetic hand, for example, can tighten its grip on a slipping glass without breaking it. In June, Jung received a $1.3 million NIH grant to purchase a sophisticated imaging system.

In July Abbas received an $870,000 NIH grant to develop a system that allows individuals with spinal cord injuries to regain greater independent function. In August, he received a $1.3 million computational neuroscience grant from the NIH. The funding will be used to gain a better understanding of spinal cord injuries and help develop advanced models for rehabilitative treatments.

Jung and Abbas co-direct the Center for Rehabilitation Neuroscience and Rehabilitation Engineering at ASU's Biodesign Institute. They are also associate professors in the Harrington Department of Bioengineering within the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering.


For more information:

"Researchers target spinal cord injuries," ASU news release, 09/23/3005