Flinn Scholars News

ASU law prof lands $500,000 NIH grant

Summary:

An Arizona State University law professor at has been awarded a $500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study legal implications of human genome sequencing.

Full Story:

An Arizona State University law professor at has been awarded a $500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to study legal implications of human genome sequencing.

Gary Marchant, executive director of the Center for Law, Science and Technology at the College of Law, will analyze the legal, ethical, and policy effects that sequencing the human genome will have on federal environmental policy and regulation.

Marchant will be leading a team that includes Andrew Askland, director of the Center for Law, Science and Technology; Richard Sharp of the Baylor College of Medicine; and Jamie Grodsky, associate professor of law at the University of Minnesota Law School.

The study will focus on:

  • The legal impact of new data on human genetic susceptibility to adverse environmental factors;
  • How human genome data can be integrated into existing legal structures;
  • The ethical and policy considerations that must be addressed in using new genomic data in environmental decision-making;
  • The development of criteria for using human-genome data in environmental regulation.

"Mapping the human genome will cause an explosion in man's knowledge of genetic factors that affect individual human susceptibility to environmental pollution," Marchant said. "The law needs to adjust and expand to meet this explosion. With this grant we will start what surely will be a long-term legal effort to catch up with this emerging knowledge."


For more information:

"Law professor wins $500,000 federal grant," Arizona Business Gazette, 7/24/2003

"ASU professor of law gets $500K grant from NIH," Business Journal, 7/25/2003

"Genes and environmental law: Study led by ASU prof to explore relationship," Arizona Daily Star, 8/7/2003